Skepticism for SB736 in the Florida Senate


Rick Scott told FOX News host Neil Cavuto after SB736 was past, “It’s going to be great.”

Not so much. Changes are already being considered. Bush Foundation CEO Patricia Levesque wants to add student surveys into the calculus and is floating the idea around. Senate Education chairman John Legg has said his committee will be considering changes to the bill. The committee’s vice chair was more poignant. This from Travis Pillow in the Tallahassee Democrat:

State Sen. Bill Montford, a Democrat from Tallahassee, has a broader range of concerns with the law.

He said placing new teachers on one-year contracts for the rest of their careers undermines their job security and could make it more difficult to attract new people to the teaching profession.

“The damage it’s doing we won’t see until five, six years down the road, when we don’t have the good qualified applicants coming into teaching,” Montford told the gathering of school administrators.

People may not take jobs in education for the money, he said, but “there’s limit to how far people will sacrifice.”

This is at odds with something else Scott said after SB736 was passed. More from Pillow:

“We must recruit and retain the best people to make sure every classroom in Florida has a highly effective teacher,” Scott said in a statement after signing the bill at a Jacksonville charter school.

Just how much Scott has become embarrassed about all this is unclear. It turned out that the KIPP charter school he signed the bill earned an F. The chairman of that KIPP school, Gary Chartrand, was named by Scott to the Florida Board of Education. Chartrand now is state board chairman. The first roll-out of SB736 this year turned out to be another disaster. The hearings in Legg’s and Montford’s committee will provide more fireworks.

Meanwhile a legal challenge to SB736 is underway in a Tallahassee courtroom.

About Bob Sikes

A long time ago and a planet far, far away I was an athletic trainer for the New York Mets. I was blessed to be part of the now legendary 1986 World Series Championship. My late father told me that I'd one day be thankful I had that degree in teaching from Florida State University. He was right and I became twice blesses to become a teacher in the late 1990's. After dabbling with writing about the Mets and then politics, I settled on education.
This entry was posted in EDUCATION, FLORIDA POLITICS and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Skepticism for SB736 in the Florida Senate

  1. kafkateach says:

    When I got my mortgage, the fact that teachers had job security compensated for my low salary. No job security, combined with low pay and unpredictable earnings, will make it impossible to get a mortgage as a teacher in the future. The pay for performance bonuses, I’m estimating anywhere from $500-$10,000, will not be enough to attract the “best and brightest.” Remember, the state does not even have to pay the bonuses if they claim the funds are not available. It’s almost the end of January and teachers in Miami have still not received any Race to the Top merit pay because they haven’t agreed to cut scores for our VAM rankings. You can’t expect people to wait a year for a bonus. Once the Race to the Top grant money runs out next year, where are school districts going to find the extra funds for merit pay?

  2. People forget that six years ago, we were recruiting in the business world, India and Canada for teachers because we couldn’t find enough. When the economy turns around it will be a disaster.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s