Trump’s Missed Opportunity on Stop and Frisk


The Clinton campaign is successfully coordinated with the media on talking points right now and distracting Donald Trump from hammering home a clear difference between himself and Clinton. While Google indeed appears to be filtering searches to favor Clinton, some pieces supporting Trump’s position on stop and frisk re getting through. Charlotte Hays gets to the gist in TownHall:

Tougher laws may subject some people to unnecessary stops, but the only people who strenuously object to stop and frisk are thugs, people contemplating a crime, and liberals who oppose the practice under the misguided notion that to do so is on the side of the underdog. The real underdog is the law-abiding citizen of the ghetto who will be only too glad of a little more law and order.

The battleground on stop and frisk is Trump’s backyard of New York City where its current mayor, Bill DeBlasio, a liberal’s liberal, made ending stop and frisk a campaign promise. He did. The NY Post explains the dynamics.

Mayor Bill de Blasio rushed to declare Donald Trump “literally all wrong” in saying Monday that stop-and-frisk is effective and constitutional. But the NYPD put out a statement that proves him wrong.

De Blasio was on MSNBC defending Hillary Clinton, who claimed that “stop-and-frisk was found to be unconstitutional” and “ineffective,” adding that it “did not do what it needed to do.” Trump disagreed on both counts — and the facts back him up.

As the NYPD release rightly notes, “Stop, Question and Frisk is not unconstitutional,” and even Judge Shira Scheindlin’s disastrous 2013 ruling never said so.

Fact is, the Supreme Court found it constitutional back in 1968 and has never reversed or even modified that decision. Scheindlin ruled merely that the NYPD’s use of the tactic had shown “deliberate indifference” to constitutional rights, claiming racial bias.

Fact is, the Supreme Court found it constitutional back in 1968 and has never reversed or even modified that decision. Scheindlin ruled merely that the NYPD’s use of the tactic had shown “deliberate indifference” to constitutional rights, claiming racial bias.

Then the US Court of Appeals threw her off the case because her “impartiality might reasonably be questioned.”

And it stayed her ruling — a step usually taken only when a decision is unlikely to survive the full appellate process.

But higher courts never finished examining her decision — because de Blasio, who’d won his race for mayor vowing to end the practice, squelched the city’s appeal.

Trump was also right to call Scheindlin “a very anti-police judge.” One of her own former clerks told The New Yorker that “she thinks cops lie.”

Scheindlin refused to even consider the tactic’s effectiveness in court. But study after study has shown it did help cut crime. After all, it took 8,000 guns off the streets in the decade before her ruling.

With FBI Director James Comey – certainly no right-wing gunslinger – testifying recently that stop and frisk is an effective law enforcement tool “when used right,” Trump has a high road he can exploit if he and his handlers can muster the discipline to not get distracted by Clinton’s cheap shots. Especially if he couples the pro-law enforcement theme with a popular bi-partisan policing and sentencing reform measures.

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About Bob Sikes

A long time ago and a planet far, far away I was an athletic trainer for the New York Mets. I was blessed to be part of the now legendary 1986 World Series Championship. My late father told me that I'd one day be thankful I had that degree in teaching from Florida State University. He was right and I became twice blesses to become a teacher in the late 1990's. After dabbling with writing about the Mets and then politics, I settled on education.
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